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Dec 7, 2017
Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

Engineers at the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors have developed a smartphone case and app that could make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they’re at home or on the go.Learn more


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Dec 6, 2017
Roberto and Colleen Padovani establish scholarship for electrical engineers at UC San Diego

Roberto and Colleen Padovani are establishing a $1 million endowed scholarship focused on exceptional undergraduates with financial need in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at the Jacobs School of Engineering.Learn more


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Nov 30, 2017
Self-Described School False Starter Aims to Pay It Forward in EdTech

What if we could use artificial intelligence to dramatically reduce the number of students who drop out of STEM-related majors? That's the question Monal Parmar, a first-generation UC San Diego alumnus, who is currently working on a master's at the Jacobs School of Engineering, asked himself. Parmar developed a device to that could help answer this question in the affirmative. He has received advice from the Jacobs School's Institute for the Global Entrepreneur. His efforts were rewarded when he was invited recently to compete in the Entrepreneurs' Organization's (EO) Global Student Entrepreneur Awards (GSEA) competition, held on Nov. 14.Learn more


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Nov 20, 2017
Controls expert Miroslav Krstic holds record seven fellowships in technical and scientific societies

2017 is turning out to be a banner year for Miroslav Krstic, a controls expert at the University of California San Diego who also serves as the senior associate vice chancellor for research here on campus. Learn more


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Nov 13, 2017
Speedy collision detector could make robots better human assistants

A faster collision detection algorithm could enable robots to work more fluidly in the operating room or at home for assisted living. The algorithm, dubbed “Fastron,” runs up to 8 times faster than existing collision detection algorithms. It uses machine learning to help robots avoid moving objects and weave through complex, rapidly changing environments in real time.Learn more


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Oct 31, 2017
UC San Diego Scientists Create Device for Ultra-Accurate Genome Sequencing of Single Human Cells

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has developed a technology for very accurate sequencing and haplotyping of genomes from single human cells. Their findings were published online in advance of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)* print edition.“Accurate sequencing of single cells will enable the identification of mutations that cause cancer and genetic disease,” said senior author Kun Zhang, a professor of bioengineering in the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. “At the same time, precise haplotyping will allow for the genotyping of haplotypes, combinations of different genes or alleles as a group from either parent.”Learn more


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Oct 31, 2017
Can Organisms Sense via Radio Frequency? A Team of UC San Diego Researchers Awarded Grant to Find Out

Can organisms use radio frequencies to sense surroundings? A new project by researchers at the University of California San Diego will investigate this biological mystery.Learn more


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Oct 26, 2017
Self-driving carts to make their debut on UC San Diego roads in January

The University of California San Diego will turn its campus into a test bed for self-driving vehicles starting in January 2018. The project will be implemented in stages. The first will be to put self-driving mail delivery carts on the road. The carts will run on algorithms developed by UC San Diego researchers who are part of the Contextual Robotics Institute. Back-up drivers will initially ride in the carts as a safety measure.Learn more


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Oct 26, 2017
11 UC San Diego Faculty Members Honored with Hellman Fellowships

Husband and wife Warren and Chris Hellman established the Hellman Fellows Program at UC San Diego in 1995 to support and encourage junior faculty to pursue research projects and creative endeavors with the goal of enhancing their candidacy for tenure. This year, 11 faculty members representing a variety of academic disciplines have been awarded a total of approximately $500,000.The UC San Diego Hellman Fellowship Program was launched by the Hellman Family Foundation with an initial gift of $2.5 million. The program proved so successful that it has since been rolled out at all 10 University of California campuses. At UC San Diego, the foundation has committed a total of $7.5 million to date for the program. The Hellmans have stated that “creating the Hellman Fellows Program is one of the best things our family has ever done with our giving.”Learn more


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Oct 25, 2017
Machine Learning Detects Marketing and Sale of Opioids on Twitter

Using advanced machine learning, a cross disciplinary team of University of California San Diego researchers developed technology that mined Twitter to identify entities illegally selling prescription opioids online.  The findings, published online in the American Journal of Public Health in October, detected 1,778 posts that were marketing the sale of controlled substances, 90 percent included hyperlinks to online sites for purchase.Learn more


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Oct 12, 2017
Laser cavities take on new shapes and functionalities

Bending laser light around sharp turns and corners—without scattering—is now possible thanks to a new laser cavity developed by electrical engineers at UC San Diego. This is the first laser cavity that can fully confine and propagate light in any shape imaginable: triangle, square, loop with jagged edges. The work could lead to faster computers and optical fibers that perform well even when they’re bent in different directions.Learn more


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Oct 6, 2017
Researchers receive NSF award to build nanolabs on a chip

Engineers at the University of California San Diego are leading a project to develop high-density nanowire arrays that can be used to measure and control multiple individual cells in large networks. Researchers envision that these nanodevices, combined with a patient’s own cells, could create low-cost, predictive drug-screening platforms to accelerate drug discovery and personalized treatments for neurological and cardiac diseases. Learn more


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Sep 20, 2017
From self-folding robots to computer vision: UC San Diego makes strong showing at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems

From self-folding robots, to robotic endoscopes, to better methods for computer vision and object detection, researchers at the University of California San Diego have a wide range of papers and workshop presentations at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (or IROS) which takes place from Sept. 24 to 28 in Vancouver, Canada. UC San Diego researchers also are organizing workshops on a range of themes during the event.Learn more


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Sep 19, 2017
Squeezing light into infinitesimally thin lines

Researchers have demonstrated a new mode of electromagnetic wave, called a "line wave," which travels along an infinitesimally thin line along the interface between two adjacent surfaces with different electromagnetic properties. The scientists expect that line waves will be useful for the efficient routing and concentration of electromagnetic energy, such as light, with potential applications in areas ranging from integrated photonics, sensing and quantum processes to future vacuum electronics.Learn more


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Sep 15, 2017
When Artificial Intelligence is Funny

What do you do if you’re an animal shelter and have to name a big litter of guinea pigs that suddenly become available for adoption and need to be named? Why, contact Janelle Shane, who earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering at UC San Diego, of course. Shane works on lasers in her day job, but her hobby is using neural networks to create paint color names, band names and much more.Her efforts have received an onslaught of media coverage, from Gizmodo, to Wired, to The Atlantic Online. When the Morris Animal Refuge in Portland, Ore., came to her, Shane agreed.Learn more


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Aug 25, 2017
Four Physician-Engineer Teams Funded by UC San Diego

Four physician-engineer teams from UC San Diego have been selected to receive the 2017 Galvanizing Engineering in Medicine (GEM) awards. This is an initiative of UC San Diego Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute (ACTRI) and UC San Diego Institute of Engineering in Medicine (IEM). It brings engineers and clinicians together to develop innovative technologies that can be applied to solving challenging problems in medical care. This year’s projects address challenges in the areas of cardiology, ophthalmology, radiology, and reproductive medicine.Learn more


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Aug 22, 2017
Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

A team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices. Learn more


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Aug 22, 2017
Gallium Nitride 'Tangoes' with Silicon to Overcome Nature's Material Limitations

Researchers at the Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Group at UC San Diego led by electrical engineering professor Shadi Dayeh have demonstrated a method to grow crack-free 19-micron-thick layers of GaN on Si.Learn more


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Aug 15, 2017
Researchers receive an NSF award to develop new neural mapping technologies of the brain

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new way to record neural activity in the brain by combining macro-scale electrophysiology with micro-scale optical imaging. The combination of the two recording modalities will provide temporal and spatial resolution previously unattained. The new imaging capability could lead to new discoveries on information processing in the brain and circuit dysfunctions for neurological disorders such as epilepsy, depression and memory disorders. Learn more


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Aug 10, 2017
Qualcomm Institute's CARI Therapeutics Awarded NIH Grant for Opioid Sensor

Researchers at the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with CARI Therapeutics of the University's Qualcomm Institute Innovation Space, have begun development of a biosensor that will detect the presence of opioids in patients in recovery and might ultimately transform the way opioid use disorders are diagnosed, monitored, and treated. The sensor also relies on research by Drew Hall, a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  Learn more