Attack-Resilient and Verifiable Autonomous Systems: A Satisfiability Modulo Convex Programming Approach

Date(s):

Location:
Jacobs School of Engineering, 9500 Gilman Dr, La Jolla, San Diego, California 92093

Sponsored By:
Professor Nikolay A. Atanasov

Speaker(s):
Yasser Shoukry
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park
Yasser Shoukry

Abstract:

Autonomous systems in general, and self-driving cars, in particular, hold the promise to be one of the most disruptive technologies emerging in recent years. However, the security and resilience of these systems, if not proactively addressed, will pose a significant threat potentially impairing our relation with these technologies and may lead to a societal rejection of adopting them permanently.

In this talk, I will focus on three problems in the context of designing resilient and verifiable autonomous systems: (i) the design of resilient state estimators in the presence of false data injection attacks, (ii) the design of resilient multi-robot motion planning in the presence of Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks and (iii) the formal verification of neural network-based controllers. I will argue that, although of a heterogeneous nature, all these problems have something in common. They can be formulated as the feasibility problem for a type of formula called monotone Satisfiability Modulo Convex programming (or SMC for short). I will present then a new SMC decision procedure that uses a lazy combination of Boolean satisfiability solving and convex programming to provide a satisfying assignment or determine that the formula is unsatisfiable. I will finish by showing, through multiple experimental results, the real-time and the resilience performance of the proposed algorithms.


Speaker Bio:
Yasser Shoukry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park where he leads the Resilient Cyber-Physical Systems Lab. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2015. Between September 2015 and July 2017, Yasser was a joint postdoctoral researcher at UC Berkeley, UCLA, and UPenn. His current research focuses on the design and implementation of resilient cyber-physical systems and IoT. His work in this domain was recognized by the Best Yasser Shoukry is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park where he leads the Resilient Cyber-Physical Systems Lab. He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2015. Between September 2015 and July 2017, Yasser was a joint postdoctoral researcher at UC Berkeley, UCLA, and UPenn. His current research focuses on the design and implementation of resilient cyber-physical systems and IoT. His work in this domain was recognized by the Best Demo Award from the International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN) in 2017, the Best Paper Award from the International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) in 2016, and the Distinguished Dissertation Award from UCLA EE department in 2016. In 2015, he led the UCLA/Caltech/CMU team to win the NSF Early Career Investigators (NSF-ECI) research challenge. His team represented the NSF- ECI in the NIST Global Cities Technology Challenge, an initiative designed to advance the deployment of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies within a smart city.Demo Award from the International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN) in 2017, the Best Paper Award from the International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) in 2016, and the Distinguished Dissertation Award from UCLA EE department in 2016. In 2015, he led the UCLA/Caltech/CMU team to win the NSF Early Career Investigators (NSF-ECI) research challenge. His team represented the NSF- ECI in the NIST Global Cities Technology Challenge, an initiative designed to advance the deployment of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies within a smart city.

Contact:
Bethany Carson
<bacarson@eng.ucsd.edu>